Research Project

Exploring the Potential for Off Peak Delivery in Metropolitan Chicago: Research Findings and Conclusions

This report serves as the basis for launching a pilot program and presents research and options as a foundation for future efforts by interested organizations to consider and adopt strategies and methods to shift more deliveries to off-peak times.

Present research and implementation options as a foundation for future efforts by interested organizations to consider and adopt strategies and methods to shift more deliveries to off-peak times.

Principal Investigator
LaBelle, James
Research Area(s)
Data Development
Freight
Policy Analysis
Co-Investigators
Frève, Sheena F.; Gottschling, Ellen
Funding Source
Illinois Department of Transportation, National University Rail Center (NURail)

Abstract

Businesses generally want to receive deliveries during their normal work hours.  Truckers need to schedule deliveries to meet those demands.  As a result, most truck deliveries occur during the most congested daytime traffic periods. If more businesses would accept deliveries in off peak times when there is less traffic congestion, trucks could deliver goods faster and at less cost. That would reduce congestion and cost of goods, and yield economic and environmental benefits. This report summarizes our research over the past two years on possible strategies to shift more deliveries of goods to times when traffic is light – i.e., off-peak delivery (OPD) – as one way to lessen congestion in the Chicago area.  The research included review of literature and case studies, data analysis, mapping, interviews and policy analysis.  And the research team collaborated with the Supply Chain Innovation Network of Chicago (SINC). Download the "Exploring the Potential for Off Peak Delivery in Metropolitan Chicago: Research Findings and Conclusions" report.